Cozen O’Connor: Hack, Ally

Ally Hack

Member

New York

(212) 453-3813

(917) 521-5738

Ally has extensive experience in all aspects of complex commercial litigation, and has litigated in both federal and state courts. While not exclusively, he has particular experience in the real estate context, including commercial and residential landlord and tenant disputes, as well as cooperative and condominium matters, and generally handles cases from inception through conclusion. Ally advises a wide variety of real estate clients, including developers, building owners, tenants, and purchasers and sellers of real property.

In addition, Ally frequently lectures and writes on various topics regarding real estate law and has been published numerous times in the New York Law Journal.

Ally earned his undergraduate degree, magna cum laude, from the University of New Mexico, Phi Beta Kappa. He earned his law degree from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, where, among other accolades, he was a member of the Arts and Entertainment Law Journal.

Experience

News

Menachem Kastner and Ally Hack Cited in Judge’s Opinion

January 08, 2015

Judge Mella of the Surrogate’s Court of the State of New York, New York County, cited to an article written by Menachem Kastner and Ally Hack, members of Cozen O’Connor’s Commercial Litigation Department, titled “To Eject or Evict – a Lease’s ‘Conditional’ Dilemma” from the New York Law Journal in 2010.

Publications

Early Termination Provisions: A Landlord’s Saving Grace…If Done Right [The New York Law Journal]

August 28, 2018

Menachem J. Kastner and Ally Hack, members in the firm's Commercial Litigation Department, co-authored, "Early Termination Provisions: A Landlord’s Saving Grace…If Done Right' for the New York Law Journal.

Incurable Defaults in Commercial Leases: Can You Un-Ring the Bell? [New York Law Journal]

March 26, 2015

Menachem Kastner and Ally Hack, members of Cozen O’Connor’s Commercial Litigation Department, authored an article for the New York Law Journal titled “Incurable Defaults in Commercial Leases: Can You Un-Ring the Bell?” They identify the various types of commercial lease defaults that courts may find to be “incurable” as a matter of law, followed by a focus on what has been the most controversial of these defaults – the unauthorized assignment of its lease. Menachem and Ally also provide a practical tip on terminating commercial leases for unauthorized assignments, where the law and the usual lease default provisions may seem contradictory.

‘Colorable Indicia of Fraud’: Not So ‘Grimm’ Anymore [New York Law Journal]

July 28, 2014

In an article published in the New York Law Journal, Menachem Kastner and Ally Hack, members of Cozen O’Connor’s Commercial Litigation Department, discuss the application of the “four-year rule” post-Grimm v. DHCR² (and its progeny), and, specifically, the slow and painful erosion of the rule.

Private Causes of Action: The Determinative Third Prong [New York Law Journal]

March 28, 2014

In an article titled “Private Causes of Action: The Determinative Third Prong,” Menachem Kastner and Ally Hack, members of Cozen O'Connor's Commercial Litigation Department, discuss when a statute gives rise to a private cause of action and the applicable three-prong test. The article endeavors to capsulize the current state of the law, including its application in real estate cases, and to simplify the formula to be applied as to when individuals can and cannot institute private causes of action based on legislation passed, ostensibly, for the public benefit.

The Four Year Rule: Where Are We Now in Light of 'Grimm' [New York Law Journal]

January 12, 2011

The purpose of this article is to survey the relevant legal precedent discussing the judicial exceptions to the Four Year Rule, note the patterns, and then formulate a cogent conclusion to assist in predicting under which circumstances the Four Year Rule will apply, and under which circumstances its exceptions will apply.

To Eject or Evict - a Lease's 'Conditional' Dilemma [New York Law Journal]

August 30, 2010

This article addresses the drafting and interpretation of a provision found in all leases: the ''default provision.'' Specifically, this article provides an analysis of the ultra-subtle and ''age-old distinction'' between the ''conditional limitation'' and the ''condition subsequent'' (the latter sometimes referred to as a ''condition''). The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York has noted that, when it comes to distinguishing between these two types of default provisions, New York courts have been ''far from consistent.''

Local Law 7: Expanding 'Housing Standards' in the Civil Court [New York Law Journal]

November 05, 2009

On March 13, 2008, the Tenant Protection Act (also known as Local Law 7 of 2008; hereinafter Local Law 7) took effect, giving tenants yet another avenue to pursue ''landlord harassment'' claims. The issues and inconsistencies raised by Local Law 7 are subtle, and could easily be overlooked by even the most careful of practitioners.

Education

  • Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University, J.D., 2004
  • University of New Mexico, B.A., magna cum laude, 2000
  • New York
  • New York Supreme Court
  • New York Court of Appeals
  • American Bar Association
  • Association of Muslim American Lawyers
  • Association of the Bar of the City of New York - MENA Committee (Middle Eastern and North African Affairs)
  • New York County Lawyers Association