Cozen O’Connor: Kay, Andrew

Andrew Kay

Member

Washington, D.C.

(202) 912-4864

(202) 861-1905

Recent News:

Andrew Kay Named to Law360’s MVP List for 2018

Law360 has recognized Andrew Kay, a member in Cozen O’Connor’s business litigation group based in Washington, D.C., as a 2018 MVP in the Insurance practice area.

Andrew Kay focuses his practice on complex commercial litigation, with particular emphases on defense of life insurers and financial services firms in class action lawsuits and regulatory litigation, commercial plaintiff lawsuits, and securities and M&A litigation. Andrew has successfully litigated a wide range of matters in federal and state courts throughout the country, including breach of contract and business tort cases, M&A disputes, securities fraud and shareholder derivative suits, governance disputes, consumer class actions, and disputes over intellectual property ownership rights. He has developed experience litigating matters in a broad range of industries, including insurance, mortgage lending, chemicals, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, telecommunications equipment, computer software and energy.

A member of the firm’s commercial litigation group, Andrew joined the firm in 2013. Andrew is active in his community. He is currently a member of the Board of Trustees of Norwood School and the Board of Directors of Communities in Schools of the Nation's Capital. He is also a member of the Development and Alumni Relations Committee of the University of Michigan Law School, and served for six years on the Board of Trustees of the Aidan Montessori School, including three years as its president. Andrew received his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Michigan Law School, where he was elected to the Order of the Coif and was an editor of the Michigan Law Review. Following law school, he clerked for the Honorable Joel M. Flaum of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit. He received his B.A. from Cornell University.

Experience

News

Andrew Kay Named to Law360’s MVP List for 2018

December 11, 2018

Law360 has recognized Andrew Kay, a member in Cozen O’Connor’s business litigation group based in Washington, D.C., as a 2018 MVP in the Insurance practice area.

Fiduciary Rule Can't Block Thrivent Arbitrations, Judge Says

November 16, 2017

Law360 discusses the federal district court’s decision entering a preliminary injunction against the U.S. Department of Labor on behalf of our client, in connection with the Department of Labor’s Fiduciary Rule.

Cozen O’Connor Names Six New Shareholders

July 20, 2015

– Cozen O’Connor promoted six members to shareholder of the firm: Philip Carroll (Chicago), William Davis (New York), John B. Galligan (New York), Kendall Hayden (Dallas), Andrew Kay (D.C.) and Vincent Pozzuto (New York).

Cozen O’Connor Attorneys Victorious in Landmark Life Insurance Unclaimed Property Case

August 14, 2014

Andrew Kay, a member of Cozen O’Connor’s Commercial Litigation Department, recently obtained a favorable ruling on behalf of Thrivent Financial in a matter relating to the unclaimed property escheatment obligations of life insurance companies.

Publications

Calif. Life Insurers Get Relief From Unclaimed Property Law [Law360]

July 30, 2018

Andrew Kay and Randy Seybold, members in the firm's Commercial Litigation Department, co-authored, "Calif. Life Insurers Get Relief From Unclaimed Property Law" for Law360.

California Controller Enjoined from Enforcing Invalid Regulations on Life Insurers [Commercial Litigation Alert]

July 24, 2018

Andrew Kay and Randy Seybold discuss the California Superior Court decision that the California controller had improperly promulgated two regulations imposing requirements on life insurers under the UPL.

Unclaimed Property: Court Holds Life Insurer’s Escheatment Duties Not Triggered By Insured’s Death [Litigation Alert]

August 18, 2014

In an opinion filed August 5, 2014, the Florida First District Court of Appeal held that under Florida’s unclaimed property law, life insurance proceeds are not “due and payable,” and the dormancy period does not begin to run, until the life insurance company receives proof of the insured’s death and surrender of the policy. The court further held that life insurance companies do not have an affirmative duty under Florida law to search death records to determine whether an insured has died.

Industry Sectors

Education

  • University of Michigan Law School, J.D., magna cum laude, 1997
  • Cornell University, B.A., 1994
  • District of Columbia
  • Illinois

Honorable Joel M. Flaum, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit