Cozen O’Connor: Kint, Brian

Brian Kint, CIPP/US

Member

Philadelphia

(215) 665-2771

(215) 701-2305

Recent Publication:

Is it Time to Rethink Notice and Choice as a Fair Information Privacy Practice? [Cyber Law Monitor Blog]

Since the 1970’s, fair information practices (FIPs) or fair information privacy practices (FIPPs) have formed the framework around which organizations structure their policies on data collection, use, disclosure, and retention.  The cornerstone of individual privacy rights under the FIPs is notice...

Brian is a certified information privacy professional (CIPP/US) who consistently finds creative solutions to his clients' problems.

Brian's passion lies at the intersection of law and technology. Prior to attending law school, Brian had a successful career as an IT professional at a large financial institution. He was credentialed as a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) and a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA). Brian’s mix of legal knowledge and IT experience makes him uniquely situated to advise and advocate for clients on constantly changing data privacy and cybersecurity issues. He can speak the language of the law as well as the language of the IT professionals responsible for developing and implementing technology solutions to adhere to the law and to the organization’s data security strategy. Not only does this capability give Brian a distinct advantage when litigating data privacy issues, but it also ensures that his clients’ legal obligations are successfully translated into effective IT solutions.

Brian serves as a judge advocate in the U.S. Army Reserve and is the secretary of the Harvard Law School Association of Greater Philadelphia.

 

Experience

News

Cozen O’Connor Elects 19 Associates to Membership

April 09, 2018

Cozen O’Connor has elected 19 associates to membership in the firm. The management committee appointed this qualified group of attorneys to membership based on demonstrated professionalism, leadership, dedication, and loyalty to Cozen O’Connor.

Publications

Is it Time to Rethink Notice and Choice as a Fair Information Privacy Practice? [Cyber Law Monitor Blog]

February 13, 2019

Since the 1970’s, fair information practices (FIPs) or fair information privacy practices (FIPPs) have formed the framework around which organizations structure their policies on data collection, use, disclosure, and retention.  The cornerstone of individual privacy rights under the FIPs is notice...

Privacy Primer: The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) [Cyber Law Monitor Blog]

February 04, 2019

COPPA is a U.S. law enacted by Congress in 1998 to address concerns regarding the online collection and disclosure of children’s personal information. Children (defined by COPPA as individuals under the age of 13) may not appreciate the significance of sharing their personal information online....

Preserving Privilege in Internal Investigations [Today's General Counsel]

August 15, 2014

In an article published in Today's General Counsel, Stephen Miller, a member of the Commercial Litigation Department, and Brian Kint, an associate in the Commercial Litigation Department, discuss the dispute involving the privileged status of documents created during internal code of business conduct (COBC) investigations conducted by Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. The case serves as a reminder that reasonable jurists can evaluate privilege issues differently and gives examples of how companies can strengthen any assertion of privilege over internal investigation materials.

Juries and Social Networking Sites [The Champion]

January 13, 2014

Social media is a mainstay in daily life. Over a billion people are registered users of Facebook. The Facebook logo and the logos of other social networking giants such as Twitter are quickly becoming as iconic as McDonald's Golden Arches or Apple's apple. As the popularity of social networking sites grew, industries scrambled to utilize such a powerful tool. The legal profession is no exception. Unfortunately, the combination of rapidly changing technology and slowly evolving law has created a potpourri of law in which little is settled or clear when it comes to social media and the courtroom. What is clear, however, is that attorneys who understand how social media can help or hurt their clients and have well-defined plans for tackling social media issues will be in the best position to successfully advocate for their clients.

Beware of Self-Promotion While Blogging [The Legal Intelligencer]

June 26, 2013

Lawyers and law firms are increasingly using blogs, also referred to as "blawgs," along with social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, to build their visibility and brand. While blogs do not have the traditional look and feel of attorney advertising, they certainly have at least some measure of commercial purpose. After all, it is unlikely that law firms would expend resources on this new form of communication if they did not at least hope to receive some return on their investment. Yet, blogs may not fit neatly inside regulations on attorney advertising that were written with more traditional media formats in mind.

Celebrity Endorsements: Your Morals Clause Return Policy [The Legal Intelligencer]

November 21, 2012

On November 5 in Edenbridge, U.K., a 30-foot-tall model of Lance Armstrong was burned to celebrate Guy Fawkes' failed plot to blow up the Parliament. The giant Armstrong likeness held a Tour de France cup in one hand and a sign in the other, which read,

A Spoliation Ace in the Hole [E-Discovery Law Review Blog]

April 17, 2012

A district court case decided last month shows how a company’s email retention and litigation hold policies can affect claims of spoliation by adverse parties in litigation. In Danny Lynn Electrical v. Veolia ES Solid Waste, No. 2:09CV192-MHT, 2012 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 31685, at *2 (M.D....

Rule 23 (f) Class Certification Appeals: Boon or Bust? [The Legal Intelligencer]

April 09, 2012

Federal court class actions have been around for over 50 years. As they grew in importance in the 1960s and 1970s, it was a bit like the tale of Frankenstein. Had the class action rule created an improved tool allowing small claimants a fair day in court against large, deep-pocketed corporations? Or had the class action become something greater than intended — something that turned the risks and costs of litigation so much against corporate defendants that the class action had merely substituted one form of unfairness for another?

Rule 23(f) Class Certification Appeals: Boon or Bust [The Legal Intelligencer]

April 09, 2012

Federal court class actions have been around for over 50 years. As they grew in importance in the 1960s and 1970s, it was a bit like the tale of Frankenstein. Had the class action rule created an improved tool allowing small claimants a fair day in court...?

NLRB Strikes Down Class Arbitration Waiver [Class Action Defense Review Blog]

February 23, 2012

Last year, in AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion, the Supreme Court upheld a class arbitration waiver in a consumer contract. Now, however, the National Labor Relations Board has struck down a similar waiver in the employment context, holding that requiring employees to submit all employment-related...

The Stop Online Piracy Act and the High Seas of the Internet Age [The Legal Intelligencer]

February 15, 2012

The Stop Online Piracy Act and the High Seas of the Internet Age - The Legal Intelligencer -

When 'The Law' Is in the Lobby [The Legal Intelligencer]

January 11, 2012

When 'The Law' Is in the Lobby - The Legal Intelligencer -

When Class Counsel Crosses an Ethical Line [Class Action Defense Review Blog]

January 09, 2012

Class actions allow for the aggregation of numerous small claims into what can prove to be a very large payday for the lawyers representing the class. On the one hand, this mechanism allows plaintiffs with small-value claims to vindicate rights that otherwise likely would not be brought to court. On...

Weighing Burdens and Benefits in Hard Drive Preservation Dispute [E-Discovery Law Review Blog]

October 31, 2011

Although deleted data can be recovered – perhaps at significant cost – destroyed data is likely gone forever. Perhaps it is for this reason that a recent federal court was reluctant to apply a strict proportionality test to a preservation dispute. In Pippins v. KPMG LLP, 2011 U.S. Dist....

Education

  • Harvard Law School, J.D., 2011
  • Georgia State University, B.A., 2008
  • New Jersey
  • Pennsylvania
  • U.S. District Court -- Eastern District of Pennsylvania
  • U.S. District Court -- New Jersey
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans' Claims

Honorable Gerald J. Pappert, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania

  • Pennsylvania Bar Association
  • Philadelphia Bar Association